Sexting one in three parents would go to police if they found

first_imgHalf of parents in Britain do not realise that their children could be committing a crime through “sexting”, new research by the NSPCC concludes,The charity said the number of children its ChildLine service had counselled specifically about the fall-out from sharing sexually explicit messages or photographs by mobile phone had jumped by 15 per cent last year alone.But a survey of parents found that 50 per cent did not know it was illegal for children to share naked or sexual pictures of themselves.Only around one in 20 parents believed their child was likely to send explicit images or videos of themselves to someone else. It is vital that parents talk to their children and that young people feel empowered to say no to sexting requestsPeter Wanless teens “We realise that talking about sexting can be an embarrassing or awkward conversation for both parents and children.“And although most parents said they would seek help if an indecent image of their child had been shared on the internet, half of them weren’t confident about getting the right support.“The NSPCC has created a new guide for parents to help them talk to their children about the risks of sexting, what the law says, and what to do if their child has shared a nude image that is being circulated online or among their peers.”The NSPCC runs a safety helpline, backed by the mobile phone network 02, on 0808 800 5002 offering advice on privacy settings and removing indecent images from children’s mobiles or other devices. Credit:Hoxton / Alamy Stock Photo Yet more than a third (35 per cent) said they would contact police if they found out their children had done so.Peter Wanless, chief executive of the NSPCC, said: “Sharing nude selfies can put young people at risk of bullying by peers or being targeted by adult sex offenders, so it’s vital that parents talk to their children and that young people feel empowered to say no to sexting requests. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Travellers at risk of disgraceful exchange rate profiteering at airports

first_imgMartin Lewis tweeted a picture of exchange rates at one airport Moneycorp, whose Gatwick-based branch was singled out for criticism from Mr Lewis, claimed its higher airport rates were due to operating costs.Retail director Tracy Bownes said the firm had to offset “significant cost… from ground rent and additional security, to the cost of staffing the bureau for customers on early and late flights.”She added: “An easy and more cost-effective way for customers to buy travel money is to pre-order online and collect at the airport. We always encourage our customers to do this, and increasing numbers of people are planning ahead in this way – we’re seeing up to 50% of transactions coming from reserve and collect customers at some of our airport bureau. Our online reserve and collect rates are always highly competitive.”David Buik, a markets commentator for leading stockbroker Panmure Gordon, said consumers were being widely exploited at airports.”The volatility of the market is such that this is now money for old rope,” he said.”The money is bouncing around like a cork in the bath and they are saying they need to protect themselves.”The foreign exchange system is not down to Brexit alone… But the pound is under pressure and we are back to the volatility days. It is somewhat inevitable that they will capitalise on vulnerable people. They know exactly what they are doing.” Martin Lewis tweeted a picture of exchange rates at one airportCredit:ITV Holidaymakers face “disgraceful” exchange rate profiteering, experts warned as several airports offer less than a euro to the pound amid the financial volatility over Brexit.Consumer champion Martin Lewis, of  MoneySavingExpert.com, launched a fierce attack on financial companies for taking advantage as one leading airport bought at 1.35 euros and sold at just 97 cents.Tweeting a picture of a Moneycorp exchange rate board which showed buy-sell spreads had edged to more than a third, he wrote: “No wonder they shouted at me ‘you’re not allowed to photograph that’. Disgraceful exchange rate profiteering [content deleted]”center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Holidaymakers were offered 97 cents for the pound at several airports on Friday after a torrid day in the currency markets following the overnight “flash crash”.Investors were this morning braced for the pound to fall further, fearing continued volatility will result from the government’s “hard Brexit” stance.last_img read more

Martin Freeman working with former partner Amanda Abbington in Sherlock was odd

first_imgMartin Freeman, the actor, has said it was ‘odd’ pretending that his former partner Amanda Abbington was his wife in the new series of Sherlock.The former couple who play Dr and Mrs Watson in the series, split in March after 16 years but were forced to work together for a large part of 2016.In last night’s episode, the pair were seen struggling to cope with a new baby, after marrying in the previous series. The pair face marital strain in the fourth series of Sherlock Credit:BBC pictures  The pair face marital strain in the fourth series of Sherlock  The former couple have two childrenCredit: Dave M. Benett “It’s all totally fine. Martin and I remain best friends and love each other, and it was entirely amicable, but we realised we’d come to the end of our time together.“There was no hostility, really; we just said that we couldn’t live together any more. So he moved out to a flat in north London, I stayed at home, and we’ve started a new chapter. He sees the children as much as he wants to.” The former couple have two children Freeman told The Observer: “We did this series not being together, which was kind of odd, although we were doing it as friends and we’re still very close.“It’s always interesting doing stuff with your partner because you know each other better than anybody else and that was obviously still the case with this series.“But it wasn’t lost on , and Amanda that ‘oh look, we’re holding our fictional baby, remember this?”Abbington told the Sunday Telegraph’s Stella Magazine that the coupe had an friendly separation and still see each other regularly. She said that one of the reasons for the split was the amount of time Freeman spent abroad, particularly when filming The Hobbit and US series Fargo.‘We’ve been apart a lot, and I think that’s one of the reasons it happened,” she said.“You can’t be away from people for too long, because you start to function on your own, you get used to being separate. You lose the connection and lose sight of it, in the end.‘It is sad and it is upsetting because you think you’re going to be with someone forever.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

The Prince William effect East Anglian Air Ambulance donations trebled after Duke

first_imgThe charity appealed to local businesses to provide equipment to furnish it, such as fridges and 55-inch televisions, but the financial records show it also spent £300,000 kitting out the base. The furnishings include a PlayStation, a fridge and cappuccino machine.The two-storey base, where the Duke and his colleagues relax between missions, also has LED lighting and sound proofing to reduce noise levels from the airport.While the latest financial records show the corporate donations have increased since the Duke joined the charity, public donations from collecting tins have dropped.The charity has received six per cent less money in its collecting boxes since 2015. The Duke of Cambridge checks his helicopter Credit:Stefan Rousseau/PA The Duke and his colleagues carried out 2,046 missions from June 2015 to July 2016, according to the EAAA’s annual report that has just been published.During this time, they helped 1,377 patients across Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, Bedfordshire, Essex and Hertfordshire. The records also reveal that the charity spent £1.5 million on new offices at Cambridge Airport for the Duke and his colleagues last year.They unveiled six months after the Duke started working for the charity and opened by the Queen in July 2016. Donations from businesses to the East Anglian Air Ambulance trebled in a year after the Duke of Cambridge started working for the charity as a pilot.Accounts show that corporate donations have risen from £55,101 in 2015 to £163,082 in 2016 thanks to what is being described as the Prince William effect.The increase shows that more companies have wanted to become involved with the charity since the Duke began working at its Cambridge base in July 2015. The Duke of Cambridge started work with the East Anglian Air Ambulance in July 2015 and is on a roster of day and night shifts which last nine and a half hours.He flies an EC145 T2 aircraft and in common with all other East Anglian Air Ambulance pilots, he is formally employed by Bond Air Services and draws a salary which he donates to charity.It has been reported that he is due to leave the EAAA this summer. The Prince William effect has been credited with a surge in business donations to the East Anglian Air Ambulancecenter_img The Duke of Cambridge checks his helicopter  The Prince William effect has been credited with a surge in business donations to the East Anglian Air AmbulanceCredit:Stefan Rousseau/PA Show more Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Rio Ferdinand praised as a hero and a warrior by fans as

first_imgThe footballer said the three months his wife spent in hospital were “incredibly difficult”.”I felt almost betrayed by the diagnosis, betrayed by the illness because you think, ‘you got it once, you are not going to get it again, surely’. Actress Tamzin Outhwaite said: “So much respect. What a wonderful man and father you are. Well done for going on that journey You are a warrior… you should be so proud of yourself.” Rio Ferdinand comes to terms with losing his wife Rebecca on a BBC documentaryCredit:BBC The help you will have given so many people last night @rioferdy5 is going to be immeasurable.Of all the trophies you won that’s your best !— Michael Vaughan (@MichaelVaughan) March 29, 2017 Still not seen it, then let this be the only thing you watch today. Thank you @rioferdy5 for telling your story 🙏 https://t.co/9ZvYCtyyH2— Ore Oduba (@OreOduba) March 29, 2017 Rio Ferdinand comes to terms with losing his wife Rebecca on a BBC documentary Brave and important from @RioFerdy5 to speak so openly about his personal grief last night.Everybody at #MUFC is right behind you, Rio. 👊 pic.twitter.com/FkvHLPEGEv— Manchester United (@ManUtd) March 29, 2017 Lord Sugar described the programme as “very moving”.Mrs Ferdinand was first treated for breast cancer in 2013 and the disease returned in an aggressive form in March 2015. Many praised him for telling his story in a way that will help others going through similar tragedies.Phillip Schofield tweeted: “That was amazing. You’ll have helped so many people.”Comedian John Bishop said he had “total respect” for Ferdinand, adding it was “moving and informative and something that will help others I am sure”.Before the programme’s broadcast, the former Leeds, Manchester United and West Ham star hit out at the Government, saying it is “wrong” to cut back the time widowed parents can receive bereavement benefits.center_img The documentary was broadcast on Tuesday, and public figures, celebrities and other fans spoke up to praise his bravery.Boxer Tony Bellew said Mr Ferdinand was “inspiring”, telling the star: “I have no words for the admiration I have for you or the bravery you are showing everyday… my heart goes out to you.” “You feel like, how can you get that type of luck. You don’t think the worst-case scenario can happen.”She died within 10 weeks of the diagnosis, leaving her family with little time to prepare for her loss.The couple’s children were aged four, six and nine at the time.The documentary followed Mr Ferdinand as he met other families coping with bereavement and looked at the support given to parents and children who lose loved ones. Very brave of @rioferdy5 to make that documentary . Very moving . I wish him and his kids all the best for the future. https://t.co/5pVOto2NvV— Lord Sugar (@Lord_Sugar) March 28, 2017 ‘I never contemplated suicide – but I can understand it now’ – #RioFerdinand opened up about the pain of losing his wife— Good Morning Britain (@GMB) March 29, 2017 Former England cricketer Graeme Swann said he had “enormous respect” for Ferdinand after watching the programme, while broadcaster Aled Jones said the account was “truly incredible”, adding: “You are an amazing person Rio.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Rio Ferdinand has been hailed as a “warrior” after speaking up about his wife in a poignant BBC documentary.Fans on social media praised him for his  powerful account of losing his wife Rebecca to cancer and raising their three children without her.She died aged 34 in 2015, weeks after being diagnosed with the disease for a second time.last_img read more

You do not represent us and you do not look like us

first_imgSurvivors of the Grenfell Tower fire have challenged the retired judge heading the inquiry into the disaster at an impassioned meeting.Residents met with Sir Martin Moore-Bick, who is heading the panel, on Monday evening in a consultation designed to let them air their views on what they want the investigation to examine.But the crowd made it clear they have little confidence in the inquiry. One local resident drew applause and cheers as she said: “You do not have our confidence, you do not represent us and you do not look like any of us.”Another local, one of the first members of public to speak said: “I don’t think you are going to do us justice.”I’m just watching you here. We need someone who’s real.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He replied: “We are talking about the same thing. We are going to investigate and find the facts in relation to the whole course of events.”And we will do that in a way that means we will get to the bottom of that.”He promised the room that the role of building regulations, the specification of the cladding and insulation, the tower’s gas pipes and the role of supervision of works carried out would also be investigated.Residents echoed concerns voiced at the last meeting with Sir Martin – that the inquiry team should better reflect the “diversity” of those on the west London estate.At least 80 people died after the fire ripped through the 24-storey tower block in north Kensington, with many of those affected being from BME (black and minority ethnic) backgrounds.Sir Martin was flanked by his inquiry team including QCs Richard Millett, Bernard Richmond and Kate Grange, inquiry secretary Mark Fisher and a female junior barrister. His comments prompted applause from the hundreds gathered in the room inside Notting Hill Community Church on Tuesday evening.He continued: “We need justice and we need it fast, and we don’t need someone who is going to play around for six weeks.”Six weeks people have had to wait for this and you are only just looking into this now?”During his initial address to the room, Sir Martin promised the inquiry would consider the design and construction of the tower, as well as the decisions that were taken in light of recent works done to the tower. Referencing the make-up of the panel, a woman said: “Look at us. Where is that reflected in you?”Who are you going to put on the panel to inject trust and confidence?”, she asked.Shouting broke out periodically over whether people other than survivors should be able to take the microphone and address the room. He confirmed that the issue of deregulation would be looked at by the inquiry.The meeting was brought to an end just before 9pm, although many local community members had already left their seats.Of the multiple suggestions for more diversity in his panel, Sir Martin told reporters afterwards: “I’m certainly going to give consideration.”Asked if he felt his team could deliver justice, he said: “If by justice, you mean getting to the facts, yes.”Calls of “Do the right thing, judge” and “Resign” were shouted at the inquiry head as he left the church.center_img Residents gathered to speak with Sir Martin Moore-Bick (centre) at Notting Hill Methodist Church in Notting Hill, London Further yells of “answer the question” were directed at the inquiry head whenever one member of the public finished speaking and a microphone was passed to another.Responding to appeals for people to be brought to justice, he said: “An inquiry is designed to find out what happened.”I have no power to do anything in relation to criminal responsibility.” Several people in told the former judge he should be mindful of his choice of language and do more than just “consider” these issues. Residents gathered to speak with Sir Martin Moore-Bick (centre) at Notting Hill Methodist Church Credit: Jonathan Brady/PAlast_img read more

Janbaz Tarin charged with Solihull murders of Raneem Oudeh and her mother

Following their deaths, there was a three-day manhunt for the suspected killer. Tarin was detained in the Sparkhill area of Birmingham on Thursday evening.The mother and daughter were stabbed at Ms Saleem’s home at just after 12.30am on Bank Holiday Monday. Nour Norris, sister of Ms Saleem, added: “Raneem is the flower our house, the flower of our life. Very, very pretty girl, she had a lot to give to everybody and to the world and to the community. “She wanted to study, she wanted to raise her son up in the best way she could.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Raneem Oudeh, 22, and her mother Khaola Saleem, 49 Police on Friday night charged a man with the murder of a mother and her daughter who were stabbed to death in Solihull.Janbaz Tarin, 21, will appear before Birmingham magistrates on Saturday. He has has been charged with the murders of Raneem Oudeh, 22, and her mother Khaola Saleem, 49, West Midlands Police said last night. It came as the family of the women paid tribute to the pair, and told how Ms Oudeh’s toddler son has been crying out for his mother in the days following her death.Salima Hobee, mother of Ms Saleem and grandmother of Ms Oudeh, told BBC News: “How I feel is beyond words, beyond description. She [Raneem] had children – one boy is only one and a half years old, a baby. “He calls out for her ‘mama, mama’. He’s been looking for her.”  Raneem Oudeh, 22, and her mother Khaola Saleem, 49 read more

Isilsupporters accused of plotting terror attack using driverless car bomb to spare

After the pair were arrested in the early hours of December 19 last year, three air rifles, two Samurai swords, a wine bottle full of sulphuric acid, homemade fireworks, and “a variety of improvised homemade fuses” were discovered at Star’s property, Ms Whyte said.The court heard how officers investigating Salah’s home discovered gunpowder and a “viable pyrotechnic fuse”.The pair both deny preparing an act of terrorism, and their trial, which is expected to last four weeks, continues on Wednesday. Of the other defendant, Ms Whyte said: “It is entirely conceivable that Andy Star’s extreme views developed a relatively short time before the events with which we are now concerned.” The bomb squad in Chesterfield The bomb squad in Chesterfield “Andy Star had access to the materials necessary to conduct small test runs with explosives and Star was making those devices in his flat.”The court also heard the ideology of Salah, of Brunswick Road, Sheffield, was evident in his social media messages, with Ms Whyte telling how his communications reflected “his affiliation to Islamic State”. On November 29 last year, he is said to have shared a 58-minute long propaganda video “designed to inspire supporters of IS but also designed to frighten those who do not support IS”, which showed scenes of warfare, beheadings and executions.Ms Whyte said that Salah had told a contact he would consider Abu Bakr Baghdadi, the caliph of Islamic State, to be a kafir, or unbeliever, if he failed to live up to “the very high standards imposed by Salah’s radical and militant form of Islam”.The prosecutor added that he had regularly expressed a desire to travel to the Sham, referring to the “wide areas of the Middle East including Syria and Iraq, parts of which Islamic State had tried to occupy”.On other messages, Salah had allegedly offered to pass over funds to a member of a Salafist Jihadist militant group. Two men accused of jointly plotting a terror attack were attempting to manufacture an explosive device involving a driverless car to spare their own lives, a court has heard.Andy Star, 32, who lived and worked at the Mermaid Fish Bar on Sheffield Road, Chesterfield, and Farhad Salah were working together in a bid to make the weapon, Sheffield Crown Court was told.On Tuesday, prosecutor Anne Whyte QC told the court how the pair were supporters of terrorist organisationIslamic State, and how Salah had arrived in the UK in 2014, but had not had his asylum claim determined prior to his arrest.She said: “The prosecution allege that Farhad Salah and Andy Star had decided that improvised explosive devices could be made and used in a way here in the UK that spared their own lives preferably but harmed others they considered to be infidels.”During her opening speech, Ms Whyte read a message, sent by 23-year-old Salah in December 2017, in which he told a contact: “My only attempt is to find a way to carry out martyrdom operation with cars without driver, everything is perfect only the programme is left.”Describing how this was evidence Salah was “attack planning”, Ms Whyte added: “But he was not planning alone. The Mermaid fish bar The Mermaid fish bar Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Teenage boy stabbed to death with Rambo knife when he refused to

Chillingly, a 15-inch version of the knife is freely available to purchase online for a sale-price £19.99.Nedim’s father, Nusret, told the Evening Standard: “He was a wonderful boy. We are devastated. He went out on his bike and never came home.“We don’t know whether they were stealing his bike or what. That’s what someone said. We were told a car pulled up and they stabbed him. We have no idea why. He was just minding his own business. He was a good boy.” Police cars at the murder scene just after the incident. Police were called to the incident just before 7pm on Monday evening.Credit:PA Police confirmed that they are looking into the possibility that it could have been a targeted attack, saying that they aren’t ruling anything out at this stage of the investigation.The boy’s mother, Reziye, visited the scene and said: “We are devastated. This violence must stop.”Islington councillor Paul Convery said the area has been plagued with gang troubles for years, with four fatal stabbings in Islington in 2018.”There is long-running antagonism between the Cally Boyz and EC1,” he said.”Violence in this area has been happening quite regularly and there has been a growing concern something more tragic could happen.He said that there were “unpleasant parallels” with the murder of Alan Cartwright in 2015, who was just 15 when he was stabbed while riding a bike on the Caledonian road. Nedim is the second teenager to be killed in the capital in 2019, after 14-year-old Jaden Moodie was knocked off a moped and stabbed to death by a group of men in Waltham Forest on January 8.Police patrols in the surrounding areas have been stepped up, and a Section 60 stop and search order, which allows police to search anyone in a specific zone, has been authorised.  A teenage boy was stabbed to death with a ‘Rambo knife’ after refusing to hand over his bicycle, his father says.Nedim Bilgin, 17, was chased along a busy street close to his Islington home by at least two teenagers on Tuesday evening, before being stabbed multiple times.Yesterday, his father said “he went out on his bike and never came home.”Two males, aged 16 and 17 were arrested near the scene on suspicion of murder, while a third man, 18, was arrested at a house not far from the Caledonian road, where the incident took place.One witness described how the boy was apparently stabbed with a ‘Rambo knife’ – a large, long bladed weapon with serrated edges.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Royal superfans criticise Harry and Meghans disappointing decision to keep birth private

Royal fans John Loughrey (left) and Terry Hutt outside the Lindo Wing at St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, London, where the Duchess of Cambridge gave birth to her three childrenCredit:Dominic Lipinski/PA Royal fans John Loughrey (left) and Terry Hutt outside the Lindo Wing at St Mary's Hospital in Paddington, London, where the Duchess of Cambridge gave birth to her three children Town Crier Tony Appleton announces that the Duchess of Cambridge has given birth to a baby boy outside the Lindo wing at St Mary's Hospital in London Terry Hutt, 83, has been a royalist since the age of four. Whether outside the Lindo wing, or on the streets of Windsor, he is often seen perched behind a security barrier dressed in a Union Jack suit and tie, joyfully celebrating significant royal milestones.But when the Duchess of Sussex gives birth to her and the Duke’s first child, Terry will not be out on the streets to cheer.The private affair which both the Duke and Duchess have chosen, has left Terry and his merry gang of Royal enthusiasts thoroughly disappointed.On Thursday, an announcement came that: “Their Royal Highnesses have taken a personal decision to keep the plans around the arrival of their baby private. The Duke and Duchess look forward to sharing the exciting news with everyone once they have had an opportunity to celebrate privately as a new family.”A photograph of the family is not expected until days after the birth, and there is no public appearance planned. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Town Crier Tony Appleton announcing that the Duchess of Cambridge has given birth to a baby boy outside the Lindo wing at St Mary’s Hospital in London last AprilCredit:AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth Margaret Tyler, 75 is originally from Hertfordshire, but moved to London to be closer to the Royal family. She has amassed an incredible collection of royal memorabilia, including a commemorative jar of pickles and an entire room in her home dedicated to Princess Diana.Another stalwart of royal celebrations she says she will miss the party atmosphere enjoyed so many times before.“It’s disappointing that we aren’t all going to meet up because we have such a fun time. People bring chocolates and drinks and we all look out for each other. It is a party time for us.“But Meghan is the one having the baby so it is no party time for her. She wants to bond with the baby. Its her body, its her baby so we had to go along with it.“I have no plans to travel to Windsor, but as soon as there is an announcement, I’ll be there.” This low-key affair has left fans unwilling to travel to Windsor in anticipation of the new baby, although they are on standby for any announcement.Mr Hutt, from Weston-Super-mare told The Telegraph: “I am disappointed they aren’t doing what they normally do. But they have decided that’s what they want to do and I am quite happy to sit back, let them celebrate with their family and then share it with everyone else.“I won’t be waiting up in Windsor, but I shall be coming straight after the birth is announced.Tony Appleton, an unofficial Royal town crier said: “I’ve got my scroll and I am ready all the time. I keep it in the boot of the car. If there is an emergency, I can take it to wherever it may be. I am on red alert.“I’m a big Meghan fan but I am very disappointed,” he added.“You’ve got to think of the public. We all love her. To try and keep it a secret is not very nice. We are all a family and it’s a happy occasion – the world wants to know. To do it two days later and announce it on instagram would be so disappointing.” Media operations have been significantly scaled back since the birth of Prince Louis, with no temporary structures likely to be erected until the Duchess has gone into labour.A spokesperson for America’s Fox News Channel told the Telegraph that they would have just three correspondents covering the event.Hotels in the town show good availability and the police have not shared any extra plans or measures with the public.This is very much being seen as the private event the Royals have wished for.A spokesperson for Windsor Great Park, where Frogmore House is situated simply said: “There are no special plans or arrangements in place, it is business as usual at Windsor Great Park.” Royal superfan Margaret Tyler at her home in London Royal superfan Margaret Tyler at her home in LondonCredit:Martin Pope read more